Holy Orders

Holy Orders

Sacraments
The Definition of the Sacrament of Holy Orders In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, or Ordination, the priest being ordained vows to lead other Catholics by bringing them the sacraments (especially the Eucharist), by proclaiming the Gospel, and by providing other means to holiness. Definition of Sacrament of holy orders, Loyola Press 322. What is the sacrament of Holy Orders? 1536 It is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to his apostles continues to be exercised in the Church until the end of time. 323. Why is this sacrament called Holy Orders? 1537-1538 Orders designates an ecclesial body into which one enters by means of a special consecration (ordination). Through a special gift of the Holy Spirit, this sacrament enables the ordained to exercise a sacred power…
Read More
Anointing of the sick

Anointing of the sick

Sacraments
  “For all who are sick, do not lose hope, especially when your suffering is at its worst. Christ is near you.” — Pope Francis "By the sacred anointing of the sick and the prayer of the priests the whole Church commends those who are ill to the suffering and glorified Lord, that he may raise them up and save them. And indeed she exhorts them to contribute to the good of the People of God by freely uniting themselves to the Passion and death of Christ." (CCC, 1499) If you or someone you know is ill and in need of anointing, please call the parish office at 401-739-0212. Introduction 376 The blessing of the sick by the ministers of the Church is a very ancient custom, having its origins…
Read More
Confirmation

Confirmation

Sacraments
Just as Baptism gives new life, Eucharist nourishes life, and Reconciliation restores life when it is broken, Confirmation strengthens that life by the gifts of the Holy Spirit (cf. CCC 1285). It is about strengthening what God has given, and continues to give, to his sons and daughters (cf. CCC 1302-1303). The Sacrament of Confirmation is not the Catholic equivalent to the Jewish bar mitzvah. Confirmation is not a “coming of age” celebration. True, most young people are just beginning to pass into early adulthood when they receive the sacrament. But Confirmation is not about coming of age. Reception of the Sacrament of Confirmation does not mark the end of formal religious education. We never outgrow a need for a deeper knowledge and appreciation of our faith. The Sacrament of Confirmation is not a rite of passage, nor a graduation from religion…
Read More
Eucharist

Eucharist

Sacraments
Understanding the Eucharist A new covenant The Eucharist symbolises the new covenant given by God to his followers. The old covenant was the one given by God to Israel when he freed his people from slavery in Egypt. The new sacrament symbolises freedom from the slavery of sin and the promise of eternal life. According to the Synpotic Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, the Eucharist was instituted by Jesus, who said the following: Take, eat, this is my body... Take, drink, this is my blood... Do this in remembrance of me. Jesus What it means Christians believe that the piece of bread that is "taken, blessed, broken and given" becomes the life of Jesus, the body of Christ. But they don't all mean the same thing by it, and…
Read More
Baptism

Baptism

Sacraments
  The Sacrament of Baptism: Gateway to New Life The sacrament of Baptism is the beginning of life—supernatural life. Because of original sin, we come into the world with a soul which is supernaturally dead. We come into the world with only the natural endowments of human nature. The supernatural life which is the result of God’s personal and intimate indwelling, is absent from the soul. Original sin is not, in the strict sense, a “blot” upon the soul. Indeed, original sin is not a “something” at all. It is the absence of something that should be there. It is a darkness where there ought to be light. Jesus instituted the sacrament of Baptism to apply to each individual soul the atonement which He made on the Cross for original…
Read More